Back in September 2019, Ebba Terry, a Year 13 student at EMS6, signed up for the annual Pope John Paul II Award.

The award, which is similar to the Duke of Edinburgh Award, challenges young people to complete a number of hours in a faith based setting, either being involved with their parish or raising social awareness in the community.

Depending on how many hours you complete, there are three tiers of success; Bronze, Silver or Gold.

In a normal year, there are many opportunities to get involved and rack up the time, however, this past year has been like no other.  With periods of lockdown, churches closed and no parish events, the task was incredibly difficult, however, this didn’t stop Ebba striving for success and achieving a silver award.

During the pandemic, Ebba helped out in school in the form of pre-recorded prayers, CAFOD projects and anything else that arose that she could get involved with such as aiding with the delivery of ashes in Ash Wednesday services (pictured in this article). In her own time, she spent many hours volunteering in the Alice House Hospice Charity Shop, her unwavering commitment to the charity helping to rack up many hours raising social awareness.

In Ebba’s own words, which she wrote in her final presentation, she said:

“My time working there has provided me with valuable life skills and has given me the opportunity to give back to the community. Furthermore, the Alice House Hospice cares for those who are terminally ill and those who are soon to pass on. Being part of this amazing charity, and helping them to raise money, so that they can make people comfortable in their last days, has helped me to also develop spiritually through the act of trying make the world a slightly better place.”

Huge congratulations to Ebba who has shown true grit and determination to persevere with the award and succeed, despite the hurdles that were put in front of her.

We wish her well in all she does to make the world a better place. We have no doubt that she will.